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THE HIGH COST OF WATER INTRUSION

Many buildings start leaking immediately after construction or show signs of problems within the first five years. Water intrusion is one of the main contributing factors to building damage, litigation, structural damage, rot, termites and microbial problems that can lead to sick building syndrome. For many, water leaks can be like a plague that just simply will not go away.

So, how serious is water intrusion?

Every year billions of dollars are spent combating water damage problems and mitigating its harmful effects to unit owners and building occupants. In the absence of intrusion, conditions are not ideal to grow mold in a house or building, if the mechanical system is designed well to standard specifications with continual functioning. However, if roofs, walls, doors, windows, or grade and below-grade conditions allow water to enter, it can set off a chain of effects that can cost thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars in property damage. Under such circumstances 'Liabilities' arise. It can create toxic mold problems and harm or even cause death to occupants in exceptional situations. Water intrusion is also a primary source for both structural and interior damage. In the event of storms or other weather-related conditions, water can drastically increase the physical damage to a structure, leading to high-cost remediation and repairs. Further, if left unchecked, hidden water intrusion can cause serious damage to both the structure of a building and threaten the health and wellbeing of those who occupy it.

We are strong proponents of building envelope commissioning and we have over twenty years of technical expertise. Employing a specialized building envelope waterproofing consultant in both the design and construction of a building can dramatically help reduce the overall liabilities associated with intrusion, toxic mold, and premature building deterioration.

THE HIGH COST OF NOT PAINTING

Renovations that include a new paint component will result in a remarkable transformation. Quality paint jobs deliver unparalleled results and a timeless aesthetic appeal that boosts market value and adds a more polished look to the property. In most cases the average home should be repainted every 6 to 8 years to maintain substrate integrity.

When you have a fresh coat of high-quality paint on an exterior surface you will decrease the risk of weather related damage. The exterior of homes is the most susceptible to damage, as it endures harsh and inclement weather conditions. Offsetting the costs associated with repairing the exterior of your home by applying paint that is durable and resistant to moisture, stains and dirt helps you stay ahead of the curve.

Sealants deteriorate over time and usually are the first item to fail allowing possible water intrusion. Most homes built before 1990 do not have proper flashings installed at the exterior openings and sealants are the only thing keeping the moisture out of wall cavities.

Lackluster curb appeal, diminished property value, and deteriorating exterior and interior conditions are the realities of not painting. Additionally if you as a property owner plan to sell in the future, it’s important you’re aware of the increased market value your property could have if a professional painter applies a high quality paint to bath the interior and exterior of your space. According to statistics homeowners can expect a 50 to 100% return on investment from interior and exterior painting.

Paint provides a many advantages to property owners, protection from the harsh environmental elements, accentuating the beauty of the space while boosting the resale value. Hiring professional painting contractors will eliminate potential hurdles involved when trying to complete painting projects by yourself. Professionals are quickly able to select the best paint for the job, use the right tools, and finish a project efficiently and on time.

Q: Which permits are needed for a construction project?

A: The building inspection department, office of planning and zoning, or department of permits in your community will have a list of permits and inspections related to building and zoning codes for new construction or remodeling.